May 14 — Day 1

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Workshop Schedule

Registration & Breakfast————7:00 AM - 8:00 AM

8:00 AM — 9:15 AM

( 75 Minutes )

Enoch First Nations Grand Entry & Day 1 Greetings

————Chief Billy Morin IV; Danielle Laribee, Minister of Children’s Services; Danielle Larivee, Minister of Children’s Services

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9:15 AM - 10:30 AM

Keynote Presentation
( 75 Minutes)

The Circle of Courage

————Dr. Martin Brokenleg


For thousands of years, North American Indigenous cultures nourished respectful and courageous children without employing punitive discipline.  Now, recent youth development research is revealing the essential elements in raising confident, caring children.  Drawing on his research with Drs. Larry Brendtro and Steve Van Bockern in their book, Reclaiming Youth at Risk, Dr. Martin Brokenleg presents the Circle of Courage which offers concrete strategies for creating environments in which all young people can grow and flourish.
 

Biography:

Dr. Martin Brokenleg is co-author of the book Reclaiming Youth at Risk:  Our Hope for the Future and co-developer of the Circle of Courage model and provides training worldwide for individuals who work with youth at risk.  He holds a doctorate in psychology and is a graduate of the Anglican Divinity School.  He is a retired professor and was most recently Director of Native Ministries and Professor of First Nations Theology at the Vancouver School of Theology.  For thirty years, Dr. Brokenleg was Professor of Native American studies at Augustana University of Sioux Falls, South Dakota.  He has also been a director of The Neighborhood Youth Corps, chaplain in a correctional setting, and has extensive experience as an alcohol counselor.  Dr. Brokenleg has consulted and led training programs throughout North America, New Zealand, Europe, Australia, and South Africa.  He is the father of three children and an enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe.

 
 
 

 
 

10:30 AM - 10:35 AM

( 5 Minutes)

Tribute to Dr. Brokenleg

————M. E. Lazerte High School


 

10:35 AM

( 15 Minutes )

Short Break

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10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Session 1
( 60 minutes )

Intergenerational Trauma

————Dr. Martin Brokenleg


Some populations display complex social patterns that are the result of history. Indigenous youth display intergenerational trauma but usually receive symptom treatment. The Circle of Courage  transforms the foundation conditions for Indigenous or any other youth.
 

Biography:

Dr. Martin Brokenleg is co-author of the book Reclaiming Youth at Risk:  Our Hope for the Future and co-developer of the Circle of Courage model and provides training worldwide for individuals who work with youth at risk.  He holds a doctorate in psychology and is a graduate of the Anglican Divinity School.  He is a retired professor and was most recently Director of Native Ministries and Professor of First Nations Theology at the Vancouver School of Theology.  For thirty years, Dr. Brokenleg was Professor of Native American studies at Augustana University of Sioux Falls, South Dakota.  He has also been a director of The Neighborhood Youth Corps, chaplain in a correctional setting, and has extensive experience as an alcohol counselor.  Dr. Brokenleg has consulted and led training programs throughout North America, New Zealand, Europe, Australia, and South Africa.  He is the father of three children and an enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe.

 
 
 

 
 

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Session 2
( 60 minute )

Comprehensive School Health: Engaging Partners and Strategies to support Youth

————Jillian Marino


Schools can offer more than a welcoming, safe, and inclusive environment for high risk youth. They can often be the only safe place to build positive and trusting relationships with role models and healthy adults. John D. Bracco has engaged a number of community partners programs and practices to support the diverse community served in Northeast Edmonton. Partnerships include The Family Centre, SACE, EISA, EMCN, REACH Edmonton, BBGC & BBBS Clubs, City of Edmonton Recreation, Edmonton Public Library, Alberta Health Services, Abundant Communities Edmonton, Hairsine Community League, Bannerman Community League, Bethel Church, Child & Family Services Northeast, Clareview Recreation Centre, Boyle Street Community League, C5 Edmonton, E4C, Elizabeth Fry Society. Programs include: Community Helpers, Be Your Own Man, Girls Empowered Program, Student Leadership Classes, Bruins  Soccer Institute, Discovery Fitness Classes, Rhythm to Recovery Drumming Groups,  Have Courage & Be Kind Weekly Student Recognition (6 Pillars of JDB),  Mental Health & Wellness Student Conference.

Practices:
Restorative Justice Practices, Success in Schools Meetings, Positive Organization Principles

Biography:

Jillian Marino is in her fifth year as Principal at John. D. Bracco Junior High School. She has served as an Assistant Principal at Queen Elizabeth, J. Percy Page, Jasper Place, and Eastglen High Schools. Having faced personal challenges involving trauma, her compassion for youth drives her to ensure their needs are addressed. She is also a wife, a daughter, an aunt and a mother of two children aged 7 and 9.
 

 
 
 

 
 

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Session 3
( 60 minute )

Creating a Policies and Practice Framework for Banning Youth

————Karen Drynan, Shawn Johnston, and Rhea Bowman


In this presentation the Action Alliance for Youth Inclusion (AAYI) will 1) share results from a study exploring the impact of being banned on youth, 2) share a framework for banning policy and practice, and 3) invite audience feedback. Youth in high-risk situations have few places they are welcome to spend time, and being banned from places such as stores and services can make it more difficult for youth to meet their needs. 39 Edmonton-area youth shared their experiences of being banned through community mapping and individual interviews, and 15 service providers shared their perspectives. Attendees will hear youth and service provider recommendations for policy and practice, and review a framework developed by AAYI in consultation with youth for practice and policy for banning. Attendees will be better informed to support youth, and advocate for and with youth who receive bans.
 

Biography:

Action Alliance for Youth Inclusion (AAYI) is a collaboration of youth-serving agencies and community partners working as allies for youth in high-risk situations. Through community-based participatory research, identifying emerging trends, and advocacy, we influence policy and take action to advance the social inclusion of youth.

Karen Drynan: Karen has worked with the high risk youth population for 16 years. A member of the AAYI (formerly OSCMAP) collaboration since 2009.

Shawn Johnston: I am a Registered Social Worker with the ACSW and have a BSW from University of Calgary. My previous positions have ranged from an Adventure Based Counselor in an Adventure Based Counselling Group Home, to a Human Rights Officer with the Alberta Human Rights Commission to a High Risk Youth Social Worker with Kids in the Hall before becoming a Community Building Social Worker with the City of Edmonton.

 
 
 

 
 

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Session 4
( 60 minute )

Building Professional Capacity around Youth Addictions

————Jennie McLester and Michelle Chaffey


The purpose of our session would be to build capacity for professionals to better understand addiction, talk about it with their youth, decrease stigma, and ultimately increase youth engagement. We will explore supporting youth in self- evaluation regarding their choices, understanding their motivations to use and ultimately navigate supportive services available in the province. We will provide from a front line perspective what the clients will go through when entering treatment and how we can work together as a community to support their recovery journey.
 

Biography:

Jennie McLester: I have been working with Youth Addiction Services for the past 14 years. In recent years I have been overseeing a Mental Health Collaborative Program in Southwest Edmonton called Connects as well as providing mobile addiction support for Leduc and coordinating the intakes with Youth Intensive Day Treatment.

Michelle Chaffey: Michelle has been with Youth Addiction Services for over 15 years. She is currently the supervisor of the Youth Residential Treatment Program. She has navigated all areas of treatment from in patient, to collaborating with Mental Health Collaborative projects such as Connects and the Way In. She has also worked in the community as a mobile counsellor as well as the Intensive Day Treatment program. Throughout all her years of service Michelle is unshakable in her belief around being client focused, strength based and the youth see her as an advocate through very difficult times in their lives.

 
 
 

 
 

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Session 5
( 60 minute )

What is Mental Health First Aid?

————Jenan Nasserdeen and Dolores Patterson (Catalyst Training Services)


Would you know what to do if someone was having a panic attack? Mental Health First Aid is the help provided to a person developing a mental health problem or experiencing a mental health crisis. This interactive presentation will give an overview of the principals of MHFA, and explore the impact of stigma and other barriers on a young person’s ability to access support.  This presentation comes alive through the use of video, audio clips, collaborative group work and facilitated discussion.  


Biography:

Jenan Nasserdeen: With 20 years of continuous service in the private and public sector, Jenan has extensive experience supporting Edmonton's most valuable population. Understanding the need for effective mental health supports in our community, Jenan empowers individuals with the principles of Mental Health First Aid and prepares them to be confident first responders.

Dolores Patterson: Incorporating over twenty years’ experience working with youth and families, Dolores is a passionate advocate for inclusion, community development and mental health awareness. An enthusiastic presenter, she has facilitated Mental Health First Aid throughout Alberta with diverse individuals and teams who are striving to empower and promote wellness for youth.
 

 
 
 

 
 

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Session 6
( 60 minute )

Empower Youth: How inserting brief therapy into the continuum of mental health services is helping to improve outcomes for young people

————Kimberly A. Knull, Katherine Hay, and Margo Long


Accessing mental health programs for youth in a timely, seamless manner has been a challenge in our city. Single session, solution focused therapy has been shown to be just as, if not more, effective than traditional forms of therapy. This presentation will review the Canadian research on the effectiveness of brief mental health services for children and youth. The results of Momentum Walk-In Counselling’s Project Impact will be discussed, and links will be made between the two studies. How brief therapy fits into the mental health continuum will be reviewed, and its benefits and drawbacks will be explored. Local collaborations between community and government organizations will be highlighted, which have been improving mental health outcomes for youth. 


Biography:

Kimberly A. Knull: Kimberly is a Registered Psychologist and Child and Adolescent therapist. She was a parenting columnist on CBC Radio for 3 years. Her organization, Momentum, helps hundreds of youth each year access low barrier, strengths based, solution focused counselling interventions. 

Katherine Hay: Katherine is the program director of AHS Young Adult Services in the Edmonton Zone. She has provided leadership and administrative oversight for three addiction and mental health clinical services currently offered to young adults in the Edmonton Zone of AHS (i.e., EEPIC, YAETRS, and YACLS). 

Margo Long: Margo is the Executive Director of YESS and a director on the board of the Mental Health Foundation. She has sound knowledge of current events and political party platforms especially regarding child and adolescent mental health. 

 
 
 

 
 

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Session 7
( 60 minute )

Reforming the Family Justice System - Helping Families Thrive

————Diana Lowe, QC


Reforming the Family Justice System - Helping Families Thrive The Reforming the Family Justice System (RFJS) initiative is a collaborative effort that began with a shared belief that Alberta’s family justice system is in crisis. We have adopted scientific evidence on brain development as foundational for our work. This brain science reveals that the toxic stress of unresolved family disputes has negative consequences for parents and their children. Legal responses to what are really social, relationship and financial problems, can do more harm than good for families. We are re-imagining the family justice system to better address the needs of families. We’ve adopted a “Theory of Change” that recognizes that family justice issues are primarily social, relationship and financial, that contain a legal element. This in-turn means that our first priority is to empower well-rounded solutions that support families as they restructure, and most importantly, to ensure that children are safe and thriving even as their families are changing.


Biography:

Diana is the Executive Counsel to the Chief Justice of the Court of Queen’s Bench. She has extensive experience in systems reform, and is co-leading the Reforming the Family Justice System (RFJS) which is collaboration designed to effect system-wide change in the family justice system in Alberta.
 

 

11:45 AM

( 60 Minutes )

Lunch Break

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12:45 PM - 1:45 PM

Keynote Presentation
( 60 Minutes )

Youth Panel Keynote

————Youth Panel


 

1:45 AM

( 15 Minutes )

Movement Break

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2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Session 8
( 90 minutes )

Celebrating and Supporting Diversity: What YOU can do to Reduce Risk Factors and Increase Protective Factors for LGBTQ Youth

————David Rust


“Celebrating and Supporting Diversity: What YOU can do to Reduce Risk Factors and Increase Protective Factors for LGBTQ Youth” is a presentation and discussion that provides opportunities for young people to receive and benefit from the understanding, relationships, supports and services that are needed for their healthy emotional and social development. Through an exploration of current North American research, evidence-based practice, known risk and protective factors, and cultural history, participants will build awareness, knowledge, skills, and general capacity in order to support sexual minority children and youth’s personal, health, mental health, behavioral and social-emotional outcomes. Participants will explore why and how to support the sexual minority (LGBTQ) students in the community, whether or not they have self-identified. It has been estimated that up to 10% of the population in all communities and cultures are gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, or two-spirited - with noted higher rates in populations including youth in care of the government, and much higher rates again for homeless youth (research indicates 35% to 52% are LGBTQ). In order to reduce their inherent mental health and social risk factors, information and discussion will be provided regarding related issues such as:

  • developing healthy relationships
  • school engagement and completion
  • bullying
  • physical violence and sexual assault
  • addiction and mental health
  • suicidal ideation
  • sexual health
  • family and social dynamics

There will be a focus on strategies to increase young people’s resilience, protective factors, and positive personal and school outcomes, as well as how to help create a culture of acceptance, support and inclusion that benefits the family and community. 

This session is appropriate for, and sensitive to, a diverse group of social workers, educators, foster parents and other child and youth stakeholders of all backgrounds (youth serving agency staff, youth workers, teachers, coaches, mentors, respite care-givers and others). It will provide opportunities to explore supporting individual diversity among children and youth within varied cultural and community contexts.  By highlighting timely legislation and advances in quality youth engagement and support, recognizing the value of the community of supports surrounding youth in care, collaborative partnerships, and by becoming familiar with current significant research from EGALE and others, child and youth resiliency and protective factor development can be realized as an essential part of building a healthy relationship, family of choice, and community. Components of youth voice and art will be utilized to demonstrate and experience young people as full stakeholders in the development of the creation of safe and caring family and community environments. Understanding who the stakeholders are and learning how to engage, inform, motivate, activate, evaluate and celebrate progress towards making service providers and communities safe and responsive to diversity of all kinds is the ultimate outcome goal, fitting well with A4YC’s mission to create a network of professionals for information sharing, capacity building, skill development, and ultimately improved outcomes for youth in care.  
 

Biography:

David is a community consultant and the Lead of the Mental Health Community Action Plan for the Mental Health Continuum Project, and contributor to the City of Edmonton Suicide Prevention Strategy. He has over 30 years of experience in community development, professional and public education, and personal development and mental health and addiction treatment programming for UNICEF, Junior Achievement, and Human Services. Clinical Supervisor for AADAC’s Mobile Services Unit, Provincial Team Lead for Alberta Health Services Mental Health Capacity Building Initiative, and Director of Community Partnerships, The Society for Safe and Caring Schools & Communities. Served as Chair of the Edmonton Inter-Agency Services Association for many years and has also worked in the areas of prevention of sexual exploitation of children and youth, suicide prevention, sexual minority youth, family reunification, and supports for multi-cultural and Aboriginal children and families. Invited to serve on the Council on Alberta Teaching Standards, the Alberta Social Policy Development Initiative Committee, the Alberta Think Tanks on Youth Engagement, and has received such recognition as the Canadian School Mental Health Award, Alberta School Council’s Association Excellence in Learning Partnerships Award, and the Man of Honour Award for community service and collaborative practices. 

 
 
 

 
 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Session 9
( 90 minute )

Rites of Passage: Creating Liminal Space where the light can enter

————Jenny Fennessy, MBPS


Community psychology studies the individual and their relationship to society. Seeking to understand how to improve quality of life of through collaborative research and action. This session will explore what knowledge and skills (linked to the themes of the conference) can be taught and processed by integrating community psychology, expressive arts and nature-based activity. Exploring their value in promoting and addressing mental health and well-being. We will explore such methodologies as ‘empowerment walk’ & ‘threshold walk’ as an opportunity to engage creatively in a process of self-reflection. These activities combine elements of nature connection for personal and spiritual development. The main spiritual concept presented in this workshop draws from ‘The Medicine Wheel’ that originates from Native American traditions for health and healing. The overall goal of the workshop is to appreciate the strengths of community psychology and nature connection as strategies and methodologies in the design of effective services for children and families experiencing adversity among other issues related to social justice, equality, immigration and human rights.
 

Biography:

Jenny has worked with young people presenting with complex needs in a variety of community-based settings. She integrates a multidisciplinary approach in her work integrating elements of community psychology, youth work, expressive arts and outdoor education to empower young people to achieve their personal potential.

 
 
 

 
 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Session 10
( 90 minute )

Workplace Well-Being: Mindfulness Practices to Care For You

————Larisa Jeffares and Nicole Wiens


A 90-minute workshop helping educators, health-care providers, first responders and human services workers, to care for themselves, prevent and understand burnout, compassion fatigue and vicarious trauma using a variety of mindfulness practices and connection to nature. Participants in the workshop will be provided with current, evidence based research around the topics of trauma and the brain, relational practice framework, compassion fatigue, vicarious trauma and mindfulness. They will engage with these topics through discussion, questions and hands on exercises. Participants will leave with a better understanding of how caring for themselves and learning to engage mindfully with others both professionally and personally leads to compassionate action and stronger relationships.
 

Biography:

Larisa Jeffares: Larisa holds her Bachelor of Arts degree from MacEwan University in Child and Youth Care Counselling, her diploma in Child and Youth Care from MacEwan University, her instructional certificate in teaching adults to meditate, Lifestyle Meditation and her Level 2 Reiki Certificate. Larisa has extensive experience working with children, youth and families. Professionally, she has worked for seventeen years with at risk youth and their families in various capacities. She has been a child and family services case worker with Inner City Connections (ICC) and the High Risk Youth Unit (HRYU). Larisa has also been an assessor for Protection for Sexually Exploited Youth and for Northern Alberta Child Intervention Services. She has worked in Boyle Street Community Services as an adult outreach worker. She is a steering-committee-member for the Allies (4) Youth Conference. Most recently, she has created a mindfulness coaching company called Wolf Willow Well-being. Wolf Willow Well-being supports people who have experienced any form of trauma using a variety of mindfulness practices, Reiki and nature as a classroom. 

Nicole Wiens: Nicole has a Bachelor of Arts degree from Concordia University College of Alberta and a Bachelor of Education degree from University of Alberta. Nicole understands the importance of mindfulness both as a personal practice and as a teaching tool, and incorporates these practices into her classroom and work with individual client. Her personal goal is: “To live life fully and help others do the same in any way that I can”.

 
 
 

 
 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Session 11
( 90 minute )

Transitioning out of care: Sailing to New Horizons

————Deb Bildfell and Avril Frost


Just like sailing the seas transitioning from one life stage to the next can be challenging and scary, but if done in a timely matter with support you can hit smooth seas and enjoy the journey. In this presentation we will discuss what is transitioning from care and why is it important to start this process early, How do we prepare for transition and what supports are available throughout the Government and community. Young adults who turn 18 and are involved with Children’s Services have a decision to make at age 18; one is to leave that support and enter into their own interdependent life or secondly they can enter into a voluntary contract with Children’s Services called a Support and Financial Agreement and together with a case worker create a plan to help that young adult enhance the skills they already have and learn new skills in order to reach the goals they have set. Support and Financial Agreements can continue till the youth is age 24 and is reviewed frequently. “The role of the Integrated Transition Specialist is to help Caseworkers problem solve complex transition matters and to support Albertans who may be falling through the gaps of government services, no matter what age they are. Deb and Avril believe everyone is an expert on their own life and offer positive, vision focused supports”.
 

Biography:

Deb Bildfell: Deb is a registered social worker and has been working as a Caseworker for
Child and Family Services for 19 years. Deb’s passion has always been to serve youth who have experienced significant trauma and feel disconnected from healthy support. Deb is currently working as an Integrated Transition Specialist, along with Avril Frost.

Avril Frost: Avril is a registered social worker and has been working as a Caseworker for both Justice and Child and Family Services for 35 years. Avril has extensive knowledge when working with Albertan’s who have and needing AISH and Persons with Developmental Disabilities supports. Avril is currently working as an Integrated Transition Specialist, along with Deb Bildfell.
 

 
 
 

 
 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Session 12
( 90 minute )

Restorative Practices in Schools - Engaging and Re-engaging Students Through Relationships

————Caroline Gosling (Missal) and Joy Malloch


“People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care” - Theodore Roosevelt. Relationships are at the centre of restorative practices which, when implemented by schools, increase student engagement in school and decrease inappropriate behaviour which typically results in suspensions. This session will begin to explore implementing restorative practices in your schools and how they can support other initiatives such as social emotional literacy, mental health, trauma informed practices and high school completion. Restorative practices in schools focus on doing things with students, not to or for students. Alberta Education’s Office of Student Attendance and Re-engagement has recently started using a restorative approach to support students in accessing learning. Research, results, and resources will be shared.   


Biography:

Caroline is an educator with 30+ years of experience as a teacher, consultant and principal. She is currently seconded part time to Alberta Education supporting mentoring in schools and the Office of Student Attendance and Re-engagement. Caroline holds a Masters degree in Educational Leadership. For the past 20 years, Caroline has done extensive work in the field of restorative justice, restorative practices in schools, and creating positive school culture for students and adults. She is a trained Community Conferencing facilitator and a trainer of facilitators. 

 
 
 

 

3:45 PM - 4:45 PM

Session 13
( 60 minutes )

Youth strengths arise from the ashes of adversity: What did youth tell us they need from service providers and how can we practice from a strengths-based approach?

————Candace Lind, Brenda Juby, and Christine Walsh


Studying protective factors as opposed to risk factors has been described as more powerful in predicting future adult outcomes for youth living with risk, and provides a strengths-based route to a more fulfilling life. Achieving the goal of healthier outcomes may be advanced by carrying out research that studies "at-risk" youths' capabilities, includes youths' voices and builds upon their strengths. We will start our session by presenting the results of our research project that explored the resilience, healthy capabilities and strengths stories of youth in challenging circumstances. We completed interviews with youth and staff across three community-based organizations that work with youth living with homelessness, conflict with the law, or receiving mental health focused treatment services. We will then share critically important aspects of effective staff relationships from the youths' perspectives, and facilitate hands-on learning of how to translate these recommendations into practice and policy, using a strengths-based approach.
 

Biography:

Candace Lind: Candace’s research focuses on youth health promotion, encompassing strategies that are relationship and strengths-based, focus on youth voice, and address the ways in which youth are conceptualized in society - to assist practice and policy development. Her work is informed by social justice and the social determinants of health.

Brenda Juby: Brenda is a Nursing Instructor with an extensive background working with “at risk” youth in schools, communities and youth-serving organizations; from a strengths-based perspective. She teaches undergraduate community health nursing and delivers workshops to educators on effective strategies to infuse a strengths approach into their clinical teaching.

Christine Walsh: Christine, Associate Dean, Research and Partnerships conducts community-based, arts-inspired and action oriented research to improve the lives of vulnerable populations including people experiencing poverty and homelessness, Indigenous Peoples and youth and adults involved in the criminal justice system.

 
 

3:30 PM

( 15 Minutes )

Short Break

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3:45 PM - 4:45 PM

Session 14
( 60 minute )

Vermilion Outreach School: Moving from Trauma Ignorant to Informed

————Derek Collins


Vermilion Outreach School staff has been on a professional development journey. Frustration and stress were high as we reacted to various behaviours in school including defiance, substance abuse and truancy. Our work with students who had not been successful in traditional settings incorporated a set of policies and ideas gained from trial and error. We knew we had to learn more about connecting with youth and building relationships. We learned about stress, trauma and attachment and formalized our policies and activities to plan how to support the various students who come to our building. We have also come to understand the importance of caring for ourselves throughout this process. The presentation will share our strategies, experiences, and the direction we are heading as we strive to Engage for Success. 
 

Biography:

Derek has been an educator for over twenty years, the last 9 years as principle of Vermilion Outreach School. His Masters in Ed. Psych focused on engaging youth. He is a registered counsellor and coordinator of the local food bank. 

 
 
 

 
 

3:45 PM - 4:45 PM

Session 15
( 60 minute )

Complex trauma and Diagnosis: What it is and what it isn’t

————Dr. Koreen Martfeld, Ph.D. in psychology, M. Counselling., B.A., B.Ed.


Youth who have experienced many adverse childhood experiences (i.e. trauma/abuse) often collect psychological diagnoses like a boy scout collects badges. This presentation will examine why this occurs, the role of the DSM 5, what it actually means, and how diagnoses can inform or misinform attempts to treat and intervene. Participants will also work with a case study to develop a trauma informed perspective on the youth, identify the youth’s needs, and choose strategies to support the youth and build healthy relationships.
 

Biography:

Koreen has worked with youth for more than twenty-five years as a registered psychologist, and school and university instructor. Koreen works as a psychologist for Yellowhead Youth Center, teaches at City University, and operates a private forensic psychology practice.

 
 
 

 
 

3:45 PM - 4:45 PM

Session 16
( 60 minute )

Let’s Talk About You(th):Restoring Connection and Restoring Justice

————Youth Restorative Action Project: Landon Turlock, YRAP File Coordinator and Shaylyn Hunter, Program Coordinator


This session will discuss the unique way that peacemaking circles in a restorative justice setting can be used to connect youth with their communities and families while providing a framework for positive growth. This interactive session will introduce participants to the concept of peacemaking circles in the context of youth justice. Participants will have an opportunity to learn about the tenets of restorative justice and practice some of the skills used in peacemaking circles. This content will be framed in an understanding of how restorative justice strengthens connections between youth and their communities, both in terms of informal and formal supports.

 

 
 
 

 
 

3:45 PM - 4:45 PM

Session 17
( 60 minute )

High Risk Youth Multidisciplinary Consultation Team

————Cst. Val Hoglund, Tennille Soderberg, and other Multidisciplinary Team members.


Multidisciplinary teams, which are comprised of staff who vary in their educational and professional experiences, bring together diverse perspectives, expertise, and skills (Kozlowski and Ilgen, 2006). Our team consists of a variety of staff from the community and government organizations who bring a variety of knowledge and resources together to support youth in the community. Often the professionals and/or families who present their youth may be exhausted from the interventions they have previously attempted without success. Our team attempts to offer a number of recommendations that are not typically used in traditional practices and may be helpful to the youth and their supports moving forward. Here we will explore the use of harm reduction, strength based approaches that incorporate our understanding of trauma, attachment and brain development to guide us as we search for appropriate strategies. We will offer a description of the team and its benefits to supporting youth with complex needs. We would also present a mock consultation to clarify what the procedure looks like and how ideas are presented.


Biography:

Cst. Val Hoglund: Val has 27 years of service with the Edmonton Police Service and is currently assigned to the Youth Services Section. She has worked with high risk youth for the past five years. 

Tennille Soderberg: Tennille has a background in Child and Youth Care and has worked in a number of positions in the community supporting youth and families. Tennille has worked as a Youth Transition Advisor for the REE*START Program for the past five years supporting youth who typically have Children’s Services and/or justice status. 

 
 
 

 
 

3:45 PM - 4:45 PM

Session 18
( 60 minute )

Building Capacity for Resilient Brains

————Jacqueline Dagneau and Jessica Karpa (The Family Centre)


We know that adverse childhood experiences, or trauma, damage the brain; executive functioning, and physical, mental and emotional health become negatively impacted (Felitti). Fortunately, we also know brains are resilient. Brains are designed to have the ability to bounce back (Neufeld). The key to rebuilding brains or accessing their resiliency is through relationship (Perry). We are essentially wired to connect and our job as youth serving providers is to connect and build resilient brains. We will walk you through the strategies we have used to significantly increase relationships and connectedness for youth to their identified communities. We will share the ways in which we explore effective approaches to reduce anxiety and alarm in our youth so that we may engage in intentional planning and opportunities to increase executive functioning. Finally, we will present on the tools we use to: assess, engage, evaluate and garner feedback.


Biography:

Jacqueline Dagneau: Jacqueline is a Registered Social Worker with a B. A. degree from Simon Fraser University and an MSc in Social Work from the University of Southampton in the U.K. she has been employed within the human services field for 18 years. Currently she is the Permanency Manager at The Family Centre.

Jessica Karpa: Jessica obtained her Bachelor of Child & Youth Care from MacEwan University in 2015. Shortly thereafter she began her career at The Family Centre. She is currently a Permanency Supervisor for Youth Intervention Specialists at The Family Centre. In her spare time, Jessica volunteers at Ronald McDonald House Charities.

 
 
 

 
 

3:45 PM - 4:45 PM

Session 19
( 60 minute )

What’s so Important about Social Emotional Learning?

————Cheryl Shinkaruk and Tammy Woroschuk (Edmonton Catholic School District)


Social emotional learning skills are essential for positive mental health, working with others, building resiliency, communicating effectively, persevering to achieve goals and building healthy relationships. Edmonton Catholic Schools has developed a Mental Health Strategic Plan, which provides a continuum of supports for students from Kindergarten to Grade 12. Guided by the work of Dr. Kutcher, we will use interactive activities to incorporate how to mitigate high risk factors through SEL, giving the youth the skills to develop healthy relationships. Through a holistic approach, we will draw upon strategies that are being used to support students in our district. This universal approach for all students, which focuses on a strengths-based student-centred method empowers students to take ownership for their actions. We will highlight some of our resources and strategies that we are currently implementing within the schools, Go to Educator, Fourth R, Mental Health Curriculum Guide, PEERS and Student Leadership Symposiums.


Biography:

Cheryl Shinkaruk: Cheryl is the Manager: Programs & Projects with Edmonton Catholic Schools. She holds her Masters of Education, along with certification in Social Emotional Learning supports within the school setting. She has a passion for supporting students through a holistic approach.

Tammy Woroschuk: Tammy is a Registered Social Worker and Manager-Social Work for ECSD. Tammy has completed her graduate level practicum with Cheryl on the topic of social and emotional learning.

 

 
 

4:45 PM - 6:30 PM

Connecting
( 105 Minutes )

Revitalize and Reflect

Introduction to A4YC Change Lab

————Jacqueline Dagneau

Networking and learning

Book Signing

————Peter Smyth